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Mike's answer:

There are two major answers that come to mind.  First, brine it. Second, DON'T overcook it!  To brine, submerge the chop in a salty liquid that basically infuses liquid into the chop.  I like to use ¾ cup of salt and 2 tbsp sugar per gallon of water as a base that can be flavored however you want.  Add some herbs, spices, or whatever…get crazy. Just make sure the flavors will play nicely with pork.  Submerge your pork chops overnight, remove and dry very well with...

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March 20, 2014

Mike's answer:

Great question!  No you certainly don’t. In fact, I would advise you to leave it on even if you don’t want to eat it.  The skin can actually serve as protection from drying out the fish during the cooking process.   When you put the fish in the pan or on the grill put the skin side down first and cook the fish 80%-90% of the total cook time before flipping.  This will allow the heat to more gently penetrate the fish and will prevent the fish from drying out. ...

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March 11, 2014

CeCe's answer:

 The short answer to your question is: any kind… almost. The only wines that I’d stay away from are those that are very sweet, like dessert wines, or those that you don’t find pleasant to drink.   To understand this better you need to understand why wine is used in risotto. This is true for any ingredient in cooking. If you don’t know why a recipe calls for a particular ingredient, you can’t know how to adjust the recipe. So why IS wine called for in risotto...

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February 1, 2014

CeCe's answer:

 The short answer to your question is: any kind… almost. The only wines that I’d stay away from are those that are very sweet, like dessert wines, or those that you don’t find pleasant to drink.   To understand this better you need to understand why wine is used in risotto. This is true for any ingredient in cooking. If you don’t know why a recipe calls for a particular ingredient, you can’t know how to adjust the recipe. So why IS wine called for in risotto...

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February 1, 2014

CeCe's answer:

 The short answer to your question is: any kind… almost. The only wines that I’d stay away from are those that are very sweet, like dessert wines, or those that you don’t find pleasant to drink.   To understand this better you need to understand why wine is used in risotto. This is true for any ingredient in cooking. If you don’t know why a recipe calls for a particular ingredient, you can’t know how to adjust the recipe. So why IS wine called for in risotto...

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February 1, 2014

CeCe's answer:

Hi there, thanks for contacting us! We are happy to help. One of two things happened.1. There is too much moisture in the meatballs, in which case you can add more breadcrumbs. Doing this will help absorb some of the moisture and prevent them from falling apart. Not too much though, or else they will be dry.2. They are falling apart because there are too many other garnish ingredients (non meat), in which case you can work in a little beaten egg before forming the meatballs. This will act...

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January 19, 2014

Ryan's answer:

Ah yes, the supermarket boxed “risotto”… a common area of confusion. Let me see if I can demystify this for you. That box on the shelf that says it’s risotto is really just a mixture of rice (usually Arborio, a common choice for making risotto) and some dried flavorings. It’s kind of like a box of “chicken noodle soup” that contains pasta, dried chicken (eww…), and spices. It’s not really chicken soup, just like that packet of risotto is not really risotto. It’s just a...

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January 13, 2014

Ryan's answer:

 The pots and pans you choose for cooking risotto do indeed matter. It’s best to cook risotto in a straight-sided pot, ideally one that will end up being about halfway full when your risotto is fully cooked. Keep in mind that the finished risotto can easily be quadruple the volume compared to the uncooked rice you started with.    There are two good reasons for using a deeper more narrow pot vs. a wide shallow pan when cooking risotto:   #1: It’s just...

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January 1, 2014

CeCe's answer:

Turkey Pan Gravy vs. Canned Gravy: Kick the can to the curb! You can make a rich and hearty real pan gravy in just minutes with the ingredients you already have. It's so easy it would be a sin to pick the can. You're family will love you a little more for this too! Here's how it's done.1. Remove the turkey from the pan. Pour off all but 1/4 cup of the drippings in the pan and reserve. Place the pan on stove on low medium heat (place over 2 burners if needed).2. Stir 2 tablespoons...

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November 28, 2013

Ryan's answer:

Great question, Jennifer. Learning how to roast a chicken perfectly is a great lesson in roasting just about anything. Ask 10 seasoned cooks how to roast chicken though and you’ll probably get 10 different answers. The fact is there are many ways to approach this. I’m going to give you what I think is the easiest way to get a consistently awesome result. It’s a long slow technique but it takes very little hands-on prep time.   Tools You’ll need a couple things to get...

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June 19, 2013
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